Atlas Listed
an Ayn Rand tribute site
because

"Before he shrugged . . . he listed."

This is an attempt to create a census of each individual mentioned in the novel, Atlas Shrugged, by Ayn Rand.

Major and minor characters are counted, including any individual mentioned by name or by title, or with a physical description or dialog, or, when in a small group, by the order within the group, or when in relationship to an individual as previously identified by the rubric above, then by the nature of that relationship, whether fictional or real, within the novel.

Please send suggestions, corrections or questions to:AtlasListed@gmail.com

Individuals are listed here in order of appearance, followed by an alphabetized list, with page numbers indicating their first appearance in the Plume trade paperback edition, August 1999 printing.

There are, based on this census, 137 individuals identified by nickname or name (first, last or both), and 581 unnamed individuals identified by job title, relationship to a named character, or otherwise as indicated above, for a total of 718 individuals counted, as listed below.

An Atlas Shrugged Census

Part I: NON-CONTRADICTION

Chapter I: THE THEME

1. Eddie Willers 3.
2. The “bum” – a shadow with no face. The first to ask, “Who is John Galt?” 3.
3. The Mayor of New York. 4.
4. The minister of the church attended by Eddie Willers who said, “We must always reach for the best within us.” 6.
5. James Taggart. 7.
6. Orren Boyle of Associated Steel. 8.
7. Ellis Wyatt. 9.
8. Old Man Wyatt, Ellis Wyatt’s father. 10.
9. Pop Harper, Chief Clerk of Taggart Transcontinental, 11.
10. Mr. Taggart. James and Dagny Taggart’s father. 11.
11. Dagny Taggart. 12.
12. Richard Halley. 13.
13. The brakeman who whistles Halley’s Fifth Concerto (and is Halley’s best pupil, see page 721). 13.
14. A man who answers, “About an hour” in response to Dagny’s question about how long the train had been standing. 15
15. The engineer of the Taggart Comet in Chapter 1. 15.
16. The conductor of the Taggart Comet in Chapter 1. 15.
17. The fireman of the Taggart Comet in Chapter 1. 15.
18. A passenger who says to Dagny, “You don’t know a thing about railroads lady.” 17.
19. The superintendent of the Ohio Division, a friend of James Taggart. 17.
20. Owen Kellog, manager of the Taggart Terminal in New York City. 17.
21. Henry Rearden. 19.
22. Mr. Ayers of the Ayers Music Publishing Company. 24.


Chapter II: THE CHAIN

23. The professor of economics who asked, “Of what importance is an individual in the titanic collective achievements of our industrial age?” 27.
24. The professor’s companion. 27.
25. The journalist who wrote, “Hank Rearden is a man who sticks his name on everything he touches.” 27.
26. The Rearden Mill worker who is in the cab of an overhead crane. 29.
27. The worker who grins at Rearden in celebration. 29.
28. Lillian Rearden. 32.
29. Henry and Phillip Rearden’s mother. 32.
30. Phillip Rearden. 32.
31. Paul Larkin. 32.
32. Mrs. Beecham. 34.
33. Miss Gwen (see page 206 for her first name) Ives, Rearden’s secretary. 42.


Chapter III: THE TOP AND THE BOTTOM

34. The bartender of the most expensive barroom in New York. 44.
35. Wesley Mouch. 45.
36. The "spic" superintendent of the San Sebastian Mines. 48.
37. The Mexican Minister of Culture. 49.
38. Francisco d’Anconia. 53.
39. The first of the two Directors of Taggart Transcontinental who resigned over the construction of the San Sebastian Line. 55.
40. The second of the two Directors of Taggart Transcontinental who resigned over the construction of the San Sebastian Line. 55.
41. The Vice-President of Operations who resigned over the San Sebastian Line. 55.
42. The new Vice-President of Operations, James Taggart’s friend. 55.
43. Nathaniel Taggart, the founder of the railroad. 59.
44. The state legislator Nat Taggart was rumored to have murdered. 60.
45. The “distinguished gentleman” who offered Nat Taggart a loan from the government. 60.
46. Dagny Taggart, Nat Taggart’s wife (also named Dagny, see page 102 for her first name). 60.
47. A millionaire who loaned Nat Taggart money. 60.
48. The owner of the small newsstand in the Taggart Terminal and former owner of a cigarette factory.  61.
49. John Galt, the “railroad worker.” 62.
50. Dick (see 718 for his first name) McNamara of Cleveland. 63.


Chapter IV: THE IMMOVABLE MOVERS

51. The President of the United Locomotive Works. 64.
52. The Chief Engineer of McNamara Contractors. 65.
53. A critic of Richard Halley’s music who said, “The music of Richard Halley has a quality of the heroic. Our age has outgrown that stuff.” 67.
54. A critic of Richard Halley’s music who said, “It has a tone of ecstasy. Who cares for ecstasy nowadays?” 67.
55. A critic of Richard Halley’s music who wrote, “The music of Richard Halley belongs to mankind.” 68.
56. A minister who said, “It is proper, it is noble that he should have endured suffering, injustice, abuse at the hands of his brothers – in order to enrich their lives.” 68.
57. A hat-check girl at the Cub Club. 69.
58. Mr. Gilbert Vail. 69.
59. Mrs. Gilbert Vail. 69.
60. Betty Pope. 70.
61. Liz Blaine, “a bitch.” 70.
62. Jock Benson, who told Betty Pope that it is Dagny who runs the railroad. 71.
63. Mr. Jules Mott, Taggart’s political man in Mexico. 72.
64. Mr. Clarence Eddington, Taggart Transcontinental’s economic consultant. 72.
65. James Taggart’s secretary, a young man. 73.
66. Francisco d’Anconia’s secretary. 73.
67. A skeptic of the Anti-Dog-Eat-Dog rule who asks, “Against whom is this Alliance being organized?” 74.
68. The first of the five dissenters who voted against the Anti-Dog-Eat-Dog rule. 75.
69. The second of the five dissenters who voted against the Anti-Dog-Eat-Dog rule. 75.
70. The third of the five dissenters who voted against the Anti-Dog-Eat-Dog rule. 75.
71. The fourth of the five dissenters who voted against the Anti-Dog-Eat-Dog rule. 75.
72. The fifth of the five dissenters who voted against the Anti-Dog-Eat-Dog rule. 75.
73. The Chairman of the National Alliance of Railroads Meeting. 75.
74. Dan Conway, president of the Phoenix-Durango. 75.
75. The charwoman who receives a $5.00 tip from Dan Conway. 75.


Chapter V: THE CLIMAX OF THE D’ANCONIAS

76. One of Francisco d’Anconia’s parents. 90.
77. The other parent. 90.
78. Sebastian d’Anconia. 91.
79. The Lord of the Inquisition. 91.
80. Mrs. Sebastian d’Anconia, the “girl he loved.” 91.
81. The Taggart Transcontinental dispatcher who hired Francisco. 92.
82. Mrs. Taggart. James and Dagny’s mother. 92.
83. The speed boat instructor. 93.
84. The elderly professor of literature and friend of Mrs. Taggart’s, who told Francisco that he should be in a library, not on an automobile junk pile. 95.
85. The stationmaster “100 miles away” who said, “We’ve got three young tramps who say they are. . . .” 95.
86. An old professor of mathematics, a friend of her father, who said, “That boy is vulnerable. He has too great a capacity for joy.” 97.
87. One of the two helpless young men at Dagny’s formal debut. 102.
88. The other young man
89. The day operator at the Rockdale station where Dagny worked. 106.
90. The Public Relations man of d’Anconia Copper in New York City. 110.
91. The waiter who turns on the radio at the Wayne-Falkland. 113.
92. Emperor Nero. 122.


Chapter VI: THE NON-COMMERCIAL

93. Dr. Simon (see page 265 for his first name) Pritchett. “Man is just a collection of chemicals with delusions of grandeur.” 131.
94. An earnest matron whose husband owns an automobile factory who asks, “But which concepts are not ugly or mean?” 132.
95. A young man who asks, “. . . by what standard?” 132.
96. An attractive young woman whose father owns a coal mine. 132.
97. A businessman who had asked Dr. Pritchett about the Equalization of Opportunity Bill. 132.
98. Balph Eubank. 133.
99. A very young girl in a white evening gown who asks, “What is the real essence of life, Mr. Eubank?” 133.
100. A wealthy woman who had inherited an oil refinery who asks, “What should we do to raise the people’s literary taste Mr. Eubank?” 133.
101. Mort Liddy, a composer of old-fashioned scores for motion pictures, and modern symphonies for sparse audiences. 133.
102. Bertram Scudder, Editor of The Future magazine and later a radio show host. 134.
103. Claude Slagenhop, President of Friends of Global Awareness. 135.
104. A middle-aged woman who had told Rearden about her psychic experiences. 136.
105. Mrs. Whitcomb. A hostess of a dinner which had been attended by both James Taggart and Lillian Rearden (but not, apparently, Balph Eubank). 137.
106. A businessman who both Dagny and Henry Rearden knew who noticed the change in Dagny’s appearance. 138.
107. A young newspaperman of the seedier sort who mentions to Rearden that Bertram Scudder is present at his anniversary party. 138.
108. Dr. Hugh Akston, the last of the advocates of reason. 141.
109. A young man who reported having read an article which declared Hugh Akston as, “the last advocate of reason.” 141.
110. Two ladies, friends of Rearden’s mother, who learn of her nursing him through his youthful struggles. 145.
111. The other lady. 145.
112. The butler with the crystal dish of canapés. 149.
113. An elderly spinster with an air of breeding who reports being afraid of the dark. 151.
114. The woman who asks the spinster why she is afraid. 151.
115. The woman who has a cousin on the coast of Maine. 151.
116. The cousin. 151.
117. Ragnar Danneskjold. 151.
118. The man who reports that nobody can catch Ragnar Danneskjold. 151.
119. The other man in the group of "three women and two men." 151.
120. A sailor who was reported to have said that Ragnar Danneskjold was a, “man born without a heart.” 152.
121. Bishop Danneskjold. Ragnar Danneskjold’s father, a Bishop (see page 757). He is reported to have disowned and excommunicated his son. 152.
122. A man who was reported to have known John Galt and was the only survivor of the sinking of his yacht. Also a friend of the great-aunt of one of the attendees at Henry and Lillian Rearden’s anniversary party. 153.
123. The great-aunt. 153.
124. Two smartly groomed women to whom Lillian Rearden shows the Rearden Metal bracelet. 155.
125. The other woman.
126. A woman who says, “You’re not serious, Miss Taggart?” 156.
127. A woman who cries, “This is horrible!” 156.
128. Simons. One of the Rearden’s household employees who was reported to have had a hard time getting the furnace started again. 157.
129. Mrs. Weston, one of the Rearden’s Anniversary Party guests. 157.
130. The Rearden’s cook. 157.


Chapter VII: THE EXPLOITERS AND THE EXPLOITED

131. Ben Nealy. 162.
132. The current Chief Engineer of Taggart Transcontinental. 162.
133. The former Chief Engineer of Taggart Transcontinental, “. . . a silent, gray-haired, self-educated man who could not be matched on any railroad. He had resigned give years ago.” 162.
134. Mr. Horace Bussby Mowen, president of the Amalgamated Switch and Signal Company, Inc. of Connecticut. 163. (Also see page 1122.)
135. Two metallurgists who Rearden sent to train Mowen’s men. 163.
136. The other metallurgist. 163.
137. The three lawyers Dagny used to open the Summit Casting plant. 163.
138. The second of the three lawyers. 163.
139. The third of the three lawyers. 163.
140. The judge Dagny used to open the Summit Casting plant. 163.
141. The state legislator Dagny used to open the Summit Casting plant. 163.
142. The Taggart engineer who supervised the Summit Casting plant. 163.
143. The note taker at the meeting between Dagny and Ben Nealy. 166.
144. Mr. Coleman of Taggart Transcontinental, the man who approved too much bark on the crossties of the John Galt line. 166.
145. The lonely airport attendant who informs Dagny that Hank Rearden did indeed fly to New York. 172.
146. The chauffer who Dagny orders to, “Stop the car!” 172.
147. The old bum sitting next to Dagny at the small diner who says, “It’s dust, lady, all of it, dust and blood. Don’t believe the dreams they pump you full of, and you won’t get hurt. 177.
148. The man who looked like a truck driver in the small diner who says, “What’s wrong with an inner spring mattress?” 177.
149. The young boy at the end of the counter in the small diner. 177.
150. A small, shriveled tramp who wore a cap pulled low over his eyes, who tells Dagny in the small diner that John Galt is the man who found the fountain of youth. 178.
151. Dr. Potter of the State Science Institute, whose position is “undefined.” 177.
152. Dr. Floyd Ferris, the coordinator of the State Science Institute. 184.
153. Dr. Robert Stadler. 185.
154. The writer who said of Dr. Stadler, “Perhaps, among the phenomena of the universe which he is studying, none is so miraculous as the brain of Dr. Robert Stadler himself.” 185.
155. The student who Dr. Stadler corrected by saying, “Free scientific inquiry? The first adjective is redundant.” 185.
156. Dr. Wilson, James Taggart’s personal physician. 192.
157. Ted Nielsen of Nielsen Motors. 202.
158. Lawrence Hammond, Hammond Cars. 202.
159. Andrew Stockton, Stockton Foundry. 202.
160. Kenneth Danagger. 202.
161. The general manager of the Atlantic Southern. 205.
162. The first of two young engineers in the shipping department of Rearden Steel. 206.
163. The other engineer. 206.
164. Flemming, the agent in Colorado assisting Henry Rearden in the purchase of a copper mine. 206.
165. Mr. Ward of the Ward Harvester Company of Minnesota. 209.
166. Mr. Ward’s father. 211.
167. The superintendent (Pete, see page 212) of the Rearden Steel Mills. 211. (see also 360 and 996).
168. The office boy from the fifth floor who informs Miss Ives about the Equalization of Opportunity Bill. 212.
169. Rearden’s “next caller” after Mr. Ward. 213.
170. Rearden’s “last caller” of the day. 213.


Chapter VIII: THE JOHN GALT LINE

171. Dwight Sanders of Sanders Aircraft and later United Locomotive Works. 217.
172. Dwight Sanders' brother. 217.
173. The preacher on a street corner Rearden had heard twenty-seven years earlier, who said “. . . the noblest ideal – that man live for the sake of his brothers, that the strong work for the weak, that he who has ability serve him who doesn’t . . .” 223.
174. A waiter at the Wayne-Falkland who, with “swift efficiency” wheels a breakfast table into the room with Eddie Willers and Henry Rearden. 225.
175. The chief metallurgist of Associated Steel, who says he would not let his children ride on the first train to cross the John Galt line bridge. 228.
176. An unnamed “famous editor” who wrote “five years earlier” that, “There are no objective facts. Every report on facts is only somebody’s opinion. It is therefore useless to write about facts. 229.
177. The sister of Mr. Mowen, in whose name he bought Taggart stock. 229.
178. The cousin of Ben Nealy in whose name Nealy bought Taggart stock. 229.
179. The delegate of the Union of Locomotive Engineers who tells Dagny that they are “not going to allow you to run that train.” 231.
180. The first of the three Taggart engineers who do not volunteer to run the first train on the John Galt line, the one “on vacation in the North Woods.” 232.
181. The second of the three Taggart engineers who do not volunteer to run the first train on the John Galt line, the one “in the hospital.” 232.
182. The third of the three Taggart engineers who do not volunteer to run the first train on the John Galt line, the one “in jail for reckless driving – of his automobile.” 232.
183. Someone in the back of the crowd who cries, “To hell with Jim Taggart!” 232.
184. Pat Logan, engineer of the Taggart Comet on the Nebraska Division. 233.
185. The old engineer who says to Dagny after she declares she will be in the cab of the first run on the John Galt line who says, “I thought you would, Miss Taggart.” 233.
186. The reporter who asks Dagny, “aren’t you going to give us a message for the public?” 234.
187. Mr. Hopkins (page 235) who asks, “ . . . what protection do we have against your line being no good?” 234.
188. The man who asked, “Aren’t you going to tell us your motive for building that line? 234.
189. The young boy (apparently a new reporter) who cries, “Oh, Miss Taggart, don’t say that!” 234.
190. Ray McKim, the fireman on the first run of the John Galt line. 235.
191. The photographer who says, laughing, “Can’t you people look doomed, please. I know that’s what the editor wants. 237.
192. The reporter who asks the brakeman, “Do you think you’ll get there?” 238.
193. The brakeman who answers, “I think we’ll get there, and so do you, brother.” 238.
194. A young reporter with years of notorious success who says, “I wish I could be a man who covers news!” 238.
195. The superintendent of the Colorado Division (who quits when the extra Diesel is given to Chick Morrison, see page 590). 239.
196. Nealy’s chief engineer. 239.
197. The “someone” who stopped to watch the silver bullet pass across a city and who flung “a cloud of paper snowflakes.” 244.
198. One of the men with a camera who calls to Dagny to, :” . . . give us a message for the public.” 248.
199. Ellis Wyatt’s servant, “an elderly Indian with a stony face and courteous manner. 248.


Chapter IX: THE SACRED AND PROFANE

200. Cherryl Brooks (see page 262 for her last name). 257.
201. Cherryl’s father. 261.
202. Cherryl’s mother. 261.
203. The first of Cherryl Brooks' four siblings. 261.
204. The second of Cherryl Brooks' four siblings. 261.
205. The third of Cherryl Brooks' four siblings. 261.
206. The fourth of Cherryl Brooks' four siblings. 261.
207. The woman who lived next door to Cherryl’s family in Buffalo and who told her it was Cheryl’s duty to help her family. 261.
208. The young boy from a “local sheet” who kept saying Dagny was a “great woman.” 268.
209. Quinn, of Quinn’s Ball Bearing Company of Connecticut. 270.
210. The friend of Mr. Mowen’s who went out of business “last week.” 272.
211. The “old woman” who lives on the edge of Starnesville. 283.
212. The man drawing water from a public well. 284.
213. His father, the owner of a grocery store. 285.
214. The “ragged little hoodlum” who threw a rock into the windshield of Rearden’s car. 286.
215. The man pushing a plow in a field outside of Starnesville. 286.


Chapter X: WYATT’S TORCH

216. The clerk of the Hall of Records in the country seat who reports the ownership of the factory is impossible to determine and is waiting on the courts to sort it out. 292.
217. Mark Yonts, the head of the People’s Mortgage Company of Rome Wisconsin, the last legal owner of the prototype of John Galt’s motor. 292.
218. The sheriff who put a padlock on the doors of the Twentieth Century Motor Company. 293.
219. Jed Starnes, the man who built the Twentieth Century Motor Company, 293.
220. Mayor Bascom of Rome Wisconsin who, among other things, informs Dagny and Rearden that he knows they are not married to each other. 293.
221. Eugene Lawson, president (page 309) of the Community National Bank in Madison, prior to joining the Bureau of Economic Planning and National Resources. 296.
222. The white-haired woman whose husband owned the dry goods store in Starnesville. 296.
223. The man who owned the dry-goods store in Starnesville. 296.
224. The first of two engineers from Taggart Transcontinental who search the Twentieth Century motor Company factory and offices (and find nothing, see page 353). 297.
225. The other engineer. 297.
226. The Purchasing Manager of Rearden Steel, an elderly man with greying hair, and “a heart which . . . was given exclusively to squeezing every last ounce of value out of a penny,” who asks, “Mr. Rearden, if you keep that up, where will be your profit?” 302.
227. The woman who kissed Eugene Lawson’s hand when he granted a loan she had begged for in vain everywhere else. 310.
228. Lee Hunsaker, president of Amalgamated Services, the company that bought Twentieth Century Motor Company from the Starnes heirs. 313.
229. Lee Hunsaker’s grandfather, a member of the “national legislature.” 314.
230. Lee Hunsaker’s father, a man who could not afford to give his son a car. 314.
231. The male friend of Lee Hunsaker who “never lifts a finger around the house” and who owns a “two-bit stationary store.” 314.
232. The female friend of Lee Hunsaker who he accuses of intentionally leaving the dishes in the sink for him to wash. 314.
233. Michael (see 316) later Midas Mulligan, the “richest and, consequently, the most denounced man in the country.” 315.
234. The economist who referred to Midas Mulligan as an audacious gambler. 315.
235. The newspaper columnist who nicknamed Michael Mulligan “Midas Mulligan.” 316.
236. The old woman who sold flowers on a Chicago street corner, the last person to see Midas Mulligan before his disappearance. 317.
237. Lee Hunsaker’s “smart, liberal lawyer” who brought suit against Midas Mulligan. 317.
238. Judge Narragansett, “one of those old-fashioned monks of the bench who . . . never feels the human side of anything. 318.
239. Roy Cunningham, “a very able fellow,” the general manager of the Twentieth Century Motor Company, who died, apparently in an automobile accident. “Drunk driving, they said.” 320.
240. The Chief of Police of Durance, Louisiana, who says of the Starnes heirs, “There’s all sorts of human beings to see in the world, there’s murders and criminal maniacs, but somehow, I think these Starnes persons are what decent people shouldn’t have to see. They’re a bad sort.” 321.
241. Eric Starnes, “well past forty,” who committed suicide when the 16 year old girl he was running after married a boy she was engaged to. 321.
242. The 16 year old girl Eric Starnes was running after. 321.
243. The fiancée, later husband, of the 16 year old girl Eric Starnes was running after. 321.
244. Gerald Starnes, the oldest son of Jed Starnes. 321.
245. A “white-haired, shriveled little tramp” in the cot next to Jed Starnes who loses a nickel to him in his sleep. 322.
246. Ivy Starnes, the only daughter of Jed Starnes. 323.
247. William Hastings of Brandon Wyoming. The chief engineer of the Twentieth Century Motor Company. John Galt’s supervisor. 324.
248. Mrs. William Hastings. 324.
249. Two workers at the counter of Dr. Akston’s diner. 327.
250. The other worker at Dr. Akston’s diner. 327.
251. The man on the railway station at Cheyenne Wyoming who says, “But laws shouldn’t be passed that way, so quickly.” 333.
252. The man on the railway station at Cheyenne Wyoming who says, “They’re not laws, they’re directives.” 333.
253. The “ragged bum” at the railway station at Cheyenne Wyoming who says, “Who is John Galt?” 334.
254. The stationmaster at Cheyenne Wyoming who holds Train Number 57 for Dagny Taggart. 334.
255. The long-distance telephone operator who tries to reach Ellis Wyatt, and who says, “Your party does not answer.” 334.

Part II: EITHER -OR

Chapter I: THE MAN WHO BELONGED ON EARTH

256. The movie producer who Dr. Ferris claimed had once told him that he would cast him as a, “titled European gigolo.” 324.
257. Mr. Balch of the Emergency Commission. 343.
258. Mr. Anderson of Crucial Supplies. 343.
259. Mr. Pettibone of Consumers’ Protection. 343.
260. Andrew Stockton’s nephew who is working to reopen the Stockton Foundry. 343.
261. A “couple of (Dr. Ferris’) younger boys” who told Dr. Stadler that Project X was “something very secret.” 344.
262. The other one of Dr. Ferris’s younger boys who told Dr. Stadler that Project X was very secret. 344.
263. Dr. Stadler’s secretary who told Dr. Stadler that Dagny Taggart was on the line. 348.
264. The columnist that “gleefully” called the six-month period after Ellis Wyatt quit, “the field day of the little fellow” and “the little fellow’s day in the sun.” 349.
265. Andrew Stockton’s sister who says, “I remember only that some man came to see him on that last evening. A stranger I’d never seen before. They talked late into the night.” 351.
266. The first scientist who Dagny interviewed who declared he could prove that the motor could not work, had never worked, and could never be made to work. 353.
267. The second scientist who Dagny interviewed who drawled that he did not know if it could be made to work and did not care to find out. 353.
268. The third scientist who Dagny interviewed who agreed to attempt the task on a ten-year contract at $25,000.00 per year, and who said, “. . . it’s you who should pay for the gamble of my time. 353.
269. The fourth scientist who Dagny interviewed who said, “I don’t think that such a motor should ever be made. . . . I don’t think the strong should have the right to wound the self-esteem of the weak.” 353.
270. Quentin Daniels. The scientist Dagny hires to reverse engineer the motor; later the janitor Midas Mulligan hires to work at the power plant. 359.
271. A man who Dagny and Dr. Stadler see at the mouth of the tunnel who is watching a man hammering at a switch who says, “What’s the matter with the damn thing? You’ve been at it for an hour. How long is it going to take? 359.
272. A man Dagny and Dr. Stadler see at the mouth of the tunnel hammering at a switch who says, “Who is John Galt?” 359.
273. The “somebody in Washington” who announced the amount of Rearden Metal that Orren Boyle could have produced under the Fair Share Law. 361.
274. Tony, the “bright young boy just out of college” sent to the Rearden Mills as Deputy Director of Distribution. (AKA "The Wet Nurse.” See page 992 for his first name.) 361.
275. The first of the four girls who work in the Deputy Director of Distribution’s office at the Rearden Mills. 361.
276. The second of the four girls who work in the Deputy Director of Distribution’s office at the Rearden Mills. 361.
277. The third of the four girls who work in the Deputy Director of Distribution’s office at the Rearden Mills. 361.
278. The fourth of the four girls who work in the Deputy Director of Distribution’s office at the Rearden Mills. 361.
279. The unnamed man with the leather leggings of a traffic cop who came to see Rearden who says, “You will regret the stand you have taken, Mr. Rearden. 364.
280. One of the domestic producers of copper who said, “It’s a deal between the boys in Washington and the importers of copper, mainly d’Anconia Copper. 374.


Chapter II: THE ARISTROCRACY OF PULL

281. Roger Marsh of Marsh Electric. 380.
282. The bellboy who put down Lillian Rearden’s suitcase in his hotel room at the Wayne-Falkland. 384.
283. The unnamed “aging sob sister” who wrote a “drippy love column” and protected Cherryl Brooks before her wedding to James Taggart. 387.
284. The woman who worked for a “high brow” political magazine, who said, “How generous of Jim!” 388.
285. Mrs. Cornelius Pope. Betty Pope’s mother. 390.
286. The elderly woman who asked James Taggart, “Did you say Miss Brooks of Madison Square?” 390.
287. The man who said, “Well, Jim Taggart is one of the most powerful men in Washington.” 390.
288. The man on the terrace who said, “Taggart can afford to do it, if he pleases.” 390.
289. The man on the terrace who said something about Emperor Caligula’s horse. 390.
290. Emperor Caligula. 390.
291. The reporter who asked, “How do you feel, Mrs. Taggart?” 392.
292. The young man with a look of alcoholic insolence who snapped, “Learned your lesson, Rearden?” 397.
293. The waiter Balph Eubank waved at. 404.
294. The woman with large diamond earrings and a flabby nervous face who asks Francisco d’Anconia, “What do you think is going to happen to the world?” 410.
295. The girl to whom, regarding Francisco d’Anconia, Bertram Scudder says, “Don’t let him disturb you.” 410.
296. The portly man with evasive eyes who says, “If this is the way you feel about money, senor, I think I’m darn glad that I’ve got a goodly piece of d’Anconia Copper stock.” 415.
297. The stocky, elderly businessman of the conscientious, unspectacular kind who was standing near Francisco and Rearden during their conversation. 420
298. The small man with lumpy flesh who said in a tone of patronizing boredom, “I don’t know, we’ll have to see, we’ll have to decide whether we’ll permit you to make any profits or not.” 420.


Chapter III: WHITE BLACKMAIL

299. The cab driver who takes Rearden to Dagny’s apartment. 424.
300. The radio newscaster who announces the crash of d’Anconia Copper. 428.
301. The owner of a copper mine in Arizona who reported Rearden’s extra order for copper. 434.
302. The person to whom the copper mine owner reported Rearden’s extra order for copper. 434.
303. The reporter who answers Eddie Willers’ question, “Isn’t there any justice left on earth?” with, “Who is John Galt?” 440.
304. Ken Danagger’s secretary, “an elderly spinster with a forbidding manner.” 440.
305. The foreman of one of the furnaces at Rearden Steel. 456.
306. The man from whom Rearden seizes a pair of goggles. 456.
307. The assistant in charge of the pressure gauge, who cries to Rearden, “I couldn’t help it . . .”. 458.


Chapter IV: THE SANCTION OF THE VICTIM

308. Lucie Judson. 461.
309. Lucie Judson’s son. 461.
310. Gertrude, the Rearden’s new cook. 461.
311. The Rearden’s butler. 466. (Possibly the same man as number 112.)
312. The traffic manager of Taggart Transcontinental (from whose filing closet Dagny Taggart steals a bottle of brandy). 475.
313. Ken Danagger’s cousin. 475.
314. The judge at Rearden’s trial who also acts as prosecutor. 476.
315. The second judge who complains that Rearden’s statements are, “completely irregular” and that “The law requires you to submit a plea.” 478.
316. The third and youngest judge at Rearden’s trial. 479.
317. Someone who, at the back of the courtroom, emitted a long whistle. 479.
318. An old woman with a shawl over her head who says, “God bless you, Mr. Rearden!” 483.
319. A man who looked like a factory worker who says, “Listen, Mr. Rearden, it’s the rich who are selling us down the river.” 483.
320. The businessman who said, “In my opinion, Rearden, it was extremely unwise of you.” 484.
321. The businessman who said, “It seems to me that this is hardly the time to make enemies.” 484
322. The businessman who said, “We can’t afford to arouse resentment” and “it’s just goading them on to seize everything.” 484.
323. The businessman who said, “Personally I am proud to be working for the public good, not just for my own profit.” 485.
324. The businessman who said, “I think some controls are necessary. The ones which are for the public good.” 485.


Chapter V: ACCOUNT OVERDRAWN

325. “A young girl student who broke down into sudden, hysterical sobs in the middle of a lecture” to whom Dr. Pritchett had said, “You must take a more philosophical attitude” regarding her experience during a volunteer relief expedition to Lake Superior, where she had witnessed a mother holding the body of her grown son who had died from starvation. 498.
326. The mother of the son who had died from starvation. 498.
327. The young man who died from starvation. 498.
328. The president of the Atlantic Southern railway. 499. (committed suicide, see 842).
329. Orren Boyle’s “most valuable friend in Washington.” 499.
330. The friend in the Ministry of Supply of the People’s State of Germany. 499.
331. The chief engineer of the Atlantic Southern. 499.
332. The unnamed “young man with a brusque voice and dark, angry eyes who came from a starving settlement” and who had organized others to mine coal at night and sell it to Rearden. 501.
333. Mr. Clem Weatherby. 502.
334. The chairman of the Taggart Board of Directors. 502.
335. The member of the Taggart Board of Directors who said, “If we consider our critical shortage of equipment. . . .” 502.
336. The “thin, pallid” member of the Taggart Board of Directors with a neat mustache” who said, the Rio Norte Line seems to have become a financial burden . . .” 502.
337. The member of the Taggart Board of Directors who said with a quavering voice, “I thought that your influence - I mean, your friendship - with Mr. Mouch would insure. . . .” 503.
338. Buzzy Watts of the National Shippers Council. 503.
339. Chick Morrison, who eventually becomes the national Morale Conditioner. 505.
340. Tinky Holloway. 505.
341. Joe Dunphy. 505.
342. Bud Hazleton. 505.
343. “A gray-haired man of patrician bearing, who had remained silent throughout” the Taggart Board of Directors meeting. 507.
344. Nat Taggart’s chief engineer. 513.
345. Prometheus. 517.
346. An old woman on the platform of the Taggart station in Marshville with a ragged shawl and the look of a hopeless appeal for help. 520.
347. An unshaved young man with gold-rimmed glasses who, standing on a crate, was yelling, “Those greedy parasites!” 520.
348. The woman with two tickets for the wrong date. 520.
349. An emancipated man who shouted, “It’s all right for you, you’ve got a good overcoat. . . .” 520.
350. A “pallid, plumpish man” on the Taggart station platform in Marshville, Colorado. 520.
351. A crying woman on the Taggart station platform in Marshville, Colorado. 520.
352. The conductor of the last run of the John Galt line. 520.
353. The porter at the Taggart Terminal carrying a bag which Lillian recognizes as belonging to Henry. 526.


Chapter VI: MIRACLE METAL

354. Fred Kinnan, head of Amalgamated Labor of America. 532.
355. George Washington (although unnamed, is quoted by Dr. Ferris). 534.
356. Julius Mouch, the one rich uncle of Wesley Mouch, whose funds Wesley had squandered before he had finished college. 537.
357. Tom Colby, rolling mill foreman and head of the Rearden Steel Workers Union, who said,” I won’t be the Judas goat leading them to the stockyards.” 554.
358. McNeil of the McNeil Car Foundry in Chicago, who retired and vanished on May 1st (in year 12 of the Strike). 556.
359. The second of nine other customers of Rearden Steel who retired and vanished on May 1st or 2nd. 556.
360. The third of nine other customers of Rearden Steel who retired and vanished on May 1st or 2nd. 556.
361. The fourth of nine other customers of Rearden Steel who retired and vanished on May 1st or 2nd. 556.
362. The fifth of nine other customers of Rearden Steel who retired and vanished on May 1st or 2nd. 556.
363. The sixth of nine other customers of Rearden Steel who retired and vanished on May 1st or 2nd. 556.
364. The seventh of nine other customers of Rearden Steel who retired and vanished on May 1st or 2nd. 556.
365. The eighth of nine other customers of Rearden Steel who retired and vanished on May 1st or 2nd. 556.
366. The ninth of nine other customers of Rearden Steel who retired and vanished on May 1st or 2nd. 556.
367. The switchman who identified Dagny Taggart to Rearden on the day Dagny and Rearden first met. 563.
368. The man beside the flatcar taking notes just prior to the moment Rearden and Dagny first meet. 563.


Chapter VII: THE MORATORIUM ON BRAINS

369. Clifton Locey, the friend of James Taggart who assumes the role of Operating Vice-President of Taggart Transcontinental after Dagny, briefly, quits. 568.
370. The young third assistant who Clifton Locey frames for not relaying an order which Mr. Locey had not given. 568.
371. The freight manager who Mr. Locey frames for issuing an order which Mr. Locey falsely claimed not to have given. 568.
372. The superintendent of the Colorado Division of Taggart Transcontinental who quit when Mr. Locey ordered the spare Diesel at the Taggart Tunnel to serve as Chick Morrison’s special. 569.
373. Dave Mitchum (see page 589) the friend of Clifton Locey and brother-in-law of Claude Slagenhop (see page 590) who was given the position of superintendent of the Colorado Division. 569.
374. Rearden’s attorney who says, “Okay, Hank. It can be done. But it will take some time.” 571.
375. The first of the two policemen, the driver of the police car, who encounter Henry Rearden and Ragnar Danneskjold on the road to Philadelphia. 582.
376. The second of the two policemen who encounter Henry Rearden and Ragnar Danneskjold on the road to Philadelphia; the one to whom Rearden describes Danneskjold as his “new bodyguard.” 583.
377. Kip Chalmers. 584.
378. Lester Tuck, an attorney and Kip Chalmers’ campaign manager. 585.
379. Laura Bradford, Kip Chalmers’ current mistress (and Wesley Mouch’s former mistress). 585.
380. Gilbert Keith-Worthing, a British novelist. 585.
381. What’s-his-name, the candidate running against Kip Chalmers. 587.
382. The great-grandfather of Gilbert Keith-Worthing. 587.
383. The conductor of the Taggart Comet (also see 603). 588
384. The engineer of the Taggart Comet (also see 603). 588.
385. The fireman of the Taggart Comet. 588.
386. The night operator of the Winston Colorado Station. 589.
387. The station agent of the Winston Colorado Station (also 603). 589.
388. The night dispatcher of the Division Headquarters at Silver Springs. 589.
389. The operator at Sherwood. 589.
390. Bill Brent, the chief dispatcher (see page 590), the best dispatcher on the system (see page 596). 589.
391. Sandy. (Note: it is unclear if this is one of the unnamed railroad workers mentioned later.) 589.
392. Clarence. (Note: it is unclear if this is one of the unnamed railroad workers mentioned later.) 589.
393. Dick Horton, the Colorado Division chief engineer who quit three days after Dave Mitchum’s arrival. 591.
394. The Taggart operator in New York. 594.
395. The young lady who accompanies Clifton Locey. 594.
396. The Omaha operator who informs Dave Mitchum that the general manager of the region headquarters has resigned. 595.
397. The assistant general manager of the region headquarters. 595.
398. The assistant general manager of the Iowa-Minnesota District. 595.
399. The chief engineer of the Central Region. 595.
400. The (night) dispatcher. 596.
401. The 48-year-old, single, trainmaster. 596.
402. The road foreman. 596.
403. Dave Mitchum’s secretary. 597.
404. The road foreman’s wife. 598.
405. The road foreman’s son in high school. 598.
406. The road foreman’s 19 year old daughter. 598.
407. The younger brother of the trainmaster who committed suicide on May 1. 599.
408. The editor of the trainmaster’s local newspaper. 599.
409. Bill Brent’s fiancée. 601.
410. Bill Brent’s mother. 601.
411. Bill Brent’s sister. 601.
412. Bill Brent’s sister’s first child. 601.
413. Bill Brent’s sister’s second child. 601.
414. Bill Brent’s sister’s third child. 601.
415. The sheriff of Winston Colorado. 602.
416. Joe Scott, the drunk engineer who runs the coal burning engine into the Taggart Tunnel. 603. (Also Joseph Scott, see 621).
417. The fireman of number 306. 604.
418. A switchman who had risked his life to save a train. 604.
419. The professor of sociology in Bedroom A, Car No. 1. 605.
420. The journalist in Roomette 7, Car No. 2. 605.
421. The elderly schoolteacher in Roomette 10, Car No. 3. 605.
422. The newspaper publisher in Drawing Room B, Car No. 4. 606.
423. The businessman in Bedroom H, Car No. 5. 606.
424. The financier in Drawing Room A, Car No. 6. 606.
425. The worker with a “right” to a job in Seat 5, Car No. 7. 606.
426. The lecturer in Roomette 6, Car No. 8. 606.
427. The professor of economics in Roomette 2, Car no. 9. 606.
428. The mother in Bedroom D, Car No. 10. 606.
429. The husband of the mother in Bedroom D, Car No. 10. 606.
430. The first child of the mother in Bedroom D, Car No. 10. 606.
431. The second child of the mother in Bedroom D, Car No. 10. 606.
432. The sniveling little neurotic in Roomette 4, Car No. 11. 606.
433. The housewife in Roomette 9, Car No. 12. 606.
434. The lawyer in Bedroom F, Car No. 13. 606.
435. The professor of philosophy in Bedroom A, Car No. 14. 606.
436. The heir in Drawing Room B, Car No. 15. 607.
437. The humanitarian in Bedroom A, Car No. 16. 607.


Chapter VIII: BY OUR LOVE

438. The Woodstock store storekeeper who says, “They’ve always been there.” 610.
439. Luke Beal, fireman of the Comet. 621.
440. The engineer of the Army Freight Special. 622.
441. Clifton Locey’s doctor. 623.
442. James Taggart’s assistant who left for Boston. 623.
443. James Taggart’s assistant who left for his father’s hospital bedside. 623.
444. James Taggart’s assistant’s father. 623.
445. The vice-president in charge of public relations. 623.
446. The radio announcer who was screaming for the nationalization of the railroads. 623.
447. The manager of the Taggart Terminal. 628.


Chapter IX: THE FACE WITHOUT PAIN OR FEAR OR GUILT

448. Caesar. 636.
449. The assistant manager of Dagny’s apartment house. 643.
450. The telephone operator who calls Afton Utah. 644.


Chapter X: THE SIGN OF THE DOLLAR

451. The conductor who tries to throw Jeff Allen off the Comet. 656,
452. The tramp who is later identified as Jeff Allen. 656.
453. The porter who orders dinner for Dagny and Jeff Allen. 657.
454. The waiter who brings Dagny and Jeff Allen their dinner. 659.
455. The young boy at the Twentieth Century Motor Company who figured out a work process that saved thousands of man-hours. 663.
456. The father who wanted to send his son to college, but was denied by “the family” at Twentieth Century and who died in a knife fight. 663.
457. The other guy in the saloon with the knife. 663.
458. The old guy with the phonograph record hobby. 663.
459. Millie Bush, a mean, ugly little eight year old who got braces. 663.
460. The Twentieth Century Motor Company staff psychologist. 664.
461. The mother of a man who had been with Twentieth Century for fifteen years. 666.
462. The man who had been with Twentieth Century for fifteen years. 666.
463. The Twentieth Century Motor Company staff doctor. 666.
464. The woman who shrieks, “What are we going to do?” 676.
465. The woman who asks, “What about the gangs of raiders?” 676.
466. The bulky man who asks, “Just where are we?” 677.
467. The passenger who asks, “How long will we be kept here?” 677.
468. The passenger who asks, “When will we get to San Francisco?” 677.
469. The woman who yells, “This is perfectly outrageous!” 677.
470. Jessup. The night dispatcher at Bradshaw Kansas. 685.
471. The chief dispatcher who is away on vacation. 685.
472. The division superintendent who has “gone down to Laurel for a couple of days.” 685.
473. The day-trick dispatcher. 686.
474. The call boy who won’t be in until morning. 686.
475. The wiper in the roundhouse. 686.
476. The sleepy attendant at the airfield. 689.
477. The lone attendant of the Afton Utah airfield. 693.


PART III A is A

Chapter I: ATLANTIS

478. Dr. Thomas Hendricks. 711.
479. The professor of economics who taught you can’t consume more than you have produced. 719.
480. The professor of history who taught that the inhabitants of slums were not the men who made this country. 719.
481. The professor of psychology who taught that men are capable of thinking. 719.
482. Galt’s Gulch’s best fishwife (Ayn Rand herself), the writer who gave Dagny a “stab of jealousy” and who believes that when, "one deals with words, one deals with the mind." 719.
483. The big muscular roughneck who had been a truck driver. 720.
484. Calvin Atwood. 723.
485. The sculptor who had run the hand-forge and repair shop. 724.
486. His partner, a chemist. 724.
487. An attractive young woman who purchased a chunk of butter from Lawrence Hammond. 726.
488. Kay Ludlow, the movie star. 727.
489. Midas Mulligan’s “special agent” who purchases goods that the valley cannot yet produce. 747.


Chapter II: THE UTOPIA OF GREED

490. The conductor of the Comet at the time it reached a small station in the middle of New Mexico. 762.
491. The station agent at the small station in the middle of New Mexico. 762.
492. The switchman at the small station in the middle of New Mexico. 762.
493. The Taggart agent at Laurel who hired Jeff Allen. 762.
494. The author of one of the two plays that Kay Ludlow performed in the Valley. 773.
495. The author of the other play performed by Kay Ludlow in the Valley. 773.
496. The Taggart terminal worker who asked, “Who said so?” 779.
497. The new Taggart terminal manager. 779.
498. The old Taggart terminal manager who quit. 779.
499. The seven year-old son of the woman who owned the bakery in the Valley. 784.
500. The four year-old son of the woman who owned the bakery in the Valley. 784.
501. John Galt’s father, the Ohio gas-station mechanic. 786.
502. Minerva, the goddess of wisdom. 786.
503. Jupiter. 786.


Chapter III: ANTI-GREED

504. The General who Dr. Ferris calls “Spud.” 817.
505. The first of two young men who escort Dr. Stadler to the Iowa demonstration of Project X. 818.
506. The second of the two young men who escort Dr. Stadler to the Iowa demonstration of Project X. 818.
507. The newsman who asks Dr. Stadler if he considers Project X to be the greatest achievement of the State Science Institute. 820.
508. Mr. Thompson, the Head of the State. 820.
509. Dr. Blodgett, the man who pulls the levers for the demonstration of Project X and who says, “That’s all there is to it.” 823.
510. The woman who screamed and then fainted at the demonstration of Project X. 824.
511. The woman who vomited. 824.
512. The radio announcer. 826.
513. The beefy speaker who says, “lack of faith is the only thing we got to fear.” 827.
514. The tall willowy woman who says, “this invention is a great, new instrument of peace.” 828.
515. The woman who says Project X should be greeted with particular gratitude by the mothers of the country. 828.
516. The young man who begs Dr. Stadler to tell the truth. 830.
517. The passer-by who tells Dagny that she is in Watsonville, Nebraska. 831.
518. The small-town reporter who Dagny meets at the airport. 832.
519. The Eldorado Hotel receptionist who says, “Just a minute please.” 834.
520. Dagny Taggart’s secretary. 835.
521. Cuffy (see 842) Meigs, the Director of Unification. 836.
522. The man who had owned the grapefruit ranch purchased by the Smather brothers. 837.
523. The old sheepherder who Dagny claims rescued her. 839.
524. The old sheepherder’s wife. 839
525. The radio announcer for Bertram Scudder’s program who says, “What am I to say to them?” 854.
526. The taxi driver who had been listening to the Scudder program who says to Dagny, “Thank you ma’am.” 854.


Chapter IV: ANTI-LIFE

527. The beggar to whom James Taggart gives a one hundred-dollar bill, who replies indifferently, “Thanks, bud. 864.
528. A visiting Argentinian legislator. 864.
529. Senor Mario Martinez, the treasurer of the Interneighborly Amity and Development Corporation. 865.
530. Senor Rodrigo Gonzales, diplomatic representative of Chile. 865.
531. His wife, Senora Gonzales. 865.
532. The local banker who killed his wife and children before committing suicide. 867.
533. The banker’s wife. 867.
534. The Tennessee factory owner. 867.
535. The Tennessee factory owner’s son who quit college. 867.
536. His murder victim. 867.
537. The Kansas station agent. 867.
538. The waiter who sponged Boyle’s garments. 867.
539. The large figure James Taggart runs into who snarls, “Look where you’re going brother!” 868.
540. Cherryl’s teacher of etiquette. 874.
541. Cherryl and James Taggart’s butler. 885.
542. Lillian Rearden’s father. 896.
543. Lillian Rearden’s lawyer. 896.
544. Caesar’s wife. 898.
545. Cherryl’s childhood preacher. 905.
546. The social worker from the five-and-ten. 905.
547. The social worker who asks Cherryl, “Are you in trouble?” 907.


Chapter V: THEIR BROTHERS' KEEPERS

548. The young roadmaster who calls Dagny directly to report a shortage of wire. 910.
549. The radio announcer who announces the crash of d’Anconia Copper. 918.
550. Senior Ramirez, Head of the People’s State of Chile. 918.
551. The man who had the manner of a jittery mobster who says, “An act of anti-social destruction.” 924.
552. The woman who asks, “How could he?” 924.
553. The young man with the odor of public payroll who says, “It was an accident.” 924.
554. The woman who says, “Right and wrong is all very well for academic conversations. . . .” 925.
555. The old man who says, “I don’t understand it.” 925.
556. The woman who says, “I thought we were living in an age of brotherhood.” 925.
557. The young girl who repeats, “I’m scared.” 925.
558. The woman who screams at the sight of the Francisco’s message. 925.
559. The station agent at the Stanford Copper Mine. 926.
560. The Washington agent who calls Rearden to tell him not to worry. 926.
561. The Taggart employee who reports, “we have no copper wire!” 937.
562. The Taggart employee who asks for a “keg of nails.” 937.
563. The Taggart employee who asks for “any sort of waterproof paint.” 937.
564. Emma Chalmers, Kip Chalmers’ mother, a recent convert to Buddhism, and organizer of Project Soybean. 937.
565. The psychologist who received a seven million dollar grant to study “brother-love.” 938.
566. The Taggart employee who reports, “People are stealing nuts and bolts out of rail plates. . . .” 938.
567. The Taggart employee from the Minnesota Division who calls Dagny to report that the harvest freight cars have not been sent. 939.
568. The Car Services Department manager. 941.
569. The Taggart employee who says, “Form 357W is filled out in every particular.” 941.
570. The comptroller. 941.
571. The Taggart employee who says, “The entries for the months of. . . .” 941.
572. The Taggart employee who says, “My files indicate the locations. . . .” 941.
573. The Taggart employee who says, “I would have to refer you to the files of Mr. Benson. . . .” 941.
574. Mr. Benson. 941.
575. The public relations woman in Washington who tells Dagny, “it is a matter of opinion whether wheat is essential to the nation’s welfare.” 941.
576. The farmer found dead in a ditch clutching a sack of wheat. 943.
577. The State Chief Executive of Minnesota. 943.
578. The waiter who says, “the assistant manager of the Taggart Terminal is on the telephone.” 948.
579. The assistant manager of the Taggart Terminal. 948.
580. The doorman of the Wayne-Falkland. 949.
581. The signal engineer who says, “It’s not supposed to fail!” 950.
582. The telephone operator. 950.
583. George, the operating vice-president of the Atlantic Southern in Chicago. 950.
584. Charles Murray, the signal engineer of the Chicago terminal of the Atlantic Southern. 950.
585. The Taggart employee who says, “ . . . the Unification Board has refused us permission to dismantle the line!” 950.
586. The Taggart employee who says, “But how are we going to get the wrecking train out of here. . . .” 950.
587. The Taggart Terminal tower director. 950.
588. The Taggart Terminal dispatcher. 952.
589. The Taggart employee who says, “Uh?’ 952. (Echoed later by Phillip Rearden, 974, Eugene Lawson, 977, and Tinky Holloway, 981.)
590. The bum at the statue of Nat Taggart who says, “Don’t take it to heart, lady.” 962.


Chapter V: THE CONCERTO OF DELIVERANCE

591. The wife of a Rearden Steel worker who is featured in a newspaper article. 963.
592. The new worker who smashed the gears of a crane and who said, “Guess I went nuts worrying about my hungry kids.” 964.
593. The first of five bystanders. 964.
594. The second of five bystanders. 964.
595. The third of five bystanders. 964.
596. The fourth of five bystanders. 964.
597. The fifth of five bystanders. 964.
598. The Washington bureaucrat who apologizes for seizing all of Henry Rearden’s assets due to, “An unfortunate mistake.” 964.
599. The soap manufacturer for whom, the bureaucrat claimed, the attachment was intended. 964.
600. The human figure Henry Rearden saw twisting and falling from a car. 988.
601. Peters. Tinky Holloway’s stooge from the Unification Board. 990.
602. The unknown thug who murdered Tony. 994.
603. Tony’s mother. 994.
604. The lout smashing glass panes at Rearden Steel. 995.
605. The first of three husky men who take him to the ground. 995.
606. The second of three husky men who take him to the ground. 995.
607. The third of three husky men who take him to the ground. 995.
608. The man who replaces Francisco when Francisco sees Rearden. 996.
609. The first of two men who attack Rearden, who says, “There he is!” 996
610. The second of two men who attack Rearden. 996.
611. The Rearden Steel doctor who says, “Nothing serious, just a scalp wound.” 996.


Chapter VII: THIS IS JOHN GALT SPEAKING

612. The chief metallurgist of Rearden Steel. 1000.
613. The chief engineer of Rearden Steel. 1000.
614. Orren Boyle’s attorney. 1002.
615. The radio station’s chief engineer who says, “we might have to delay the broadcast.” 1007.
616. The man who was the greatest philosopher (Aristotle). 1016.
617. The man who discovered the use of steam. 1047.
618. The man who discovered the use of oil. 1047.


Chapter VIII: THE EGOIST

619. The third-rate assistant who screams, “Let me out of here!” 1070.
620. The radio station’s program director. 1071.
621. The first of Chick Morrison’s half-dozen morale conditioners. 1071.
622. The second of Chick Morrison’s half-dozen morale conditioners. 1071.
623. The third of Chick Morrison’s half-dozen morale conditioners. 1071.
624. The fourth of Chick Morrison’s half-dozen morale conditioners. 1071.
625. The fifth of Chick Morrison’s half-dozen morale conditioners. 1071.
626. The sixth of Chick Morrison’s half-dozen morale conditioners. 1071.
627. The dad in the domestic radio comedy. 1076.
628. The mom in the domestic radio comedy. 1076
629. Junior in the domestic radio comedy. 1076.
630. The speaker at a political meeting in Cleveland. 1079.
631. The foreman of a Massachusetts shoe shop. 1079.
632. The superintendent of a Massachusetts shoe shop. 1079.
633. The general manager of a Massachusetts shoe shop. 1079.
634. The company president of a Massachusetts shoe shop. 1079.
635. The woman in a movie theater who screamed, “You goddamn cannibals.” 1079.
636. A man who was hospitalized after being beaten by his older brother. 1080.
637. The older brother. 1080.
638. A woman with a fractured jaw. 1080.
639. The stranger who slapped her in the face. 1080.
640. The woman’s five-year-old son. 1080.
641. The assistant superintendent of an oil refinery who refused to accept the position of superintendent claiming, “I don’t know what to do.” 1081.
642. The John Galt who is an 80-year-old professor of ornithology. 1082.
643. The John Galt who is a retired greengrocer. 1082.
644. The wife of John Galt, the greengrocer. 1082.
645. The first of their nine children. 1082.
646. The second of their nine children. 1082.
647. The third of their nine children. 1082.
648. The fourth of their nine children. 1082.
649. The fifth of their nine children. 1082.
650. The sixth of their nine children. 1082.
651. The seventh of their nine children. 1082.
652. The eighth of their nine children. 1082.
653. The ninth of their nine children. 1082.
654. The foreman who was beaten by the workers of a factory. 1082.
655. The first of the People’s Managers of Rearden Steel. 1083.
656. Orren Boyle’s doctor. 1083.
657. The second People’s Manager of Rearden Steel. 1083.
658. The sixty-year-old Rearden Steel worker who set fire to one of the buildings with the cry, “To avenge Hank Rearden!” 1083.
659. The young pilot who quit after flying over the closed Rearden Steel plant. 1084.
660. The foreman of the Taggart Terminal track laborers who says, “Yeah, I guess so.” 1087.
661. The leader of the four men who come to arrest John Galt who says, “Are you John Galt?” 1094.
662. The first of the three other armed men. 1094.
663. The second of the three other armed men. 1094.
664. The third of the three other armed men. 1094.
665. The ragged old woman who Chick Morrison passed by. 1106.
666. The guard who brought John Galt a package of cigarettes. 1113.
667. The guard who is surprised when Mr. Thomson shoves Dr. Ferris out the door. 1114.
668. The waiter who tells Mr. Thompson, “No grapefruit juice.” 1115.
669. The San Francisco Taggart Terminal manager. 1116.
670. The first of two representatives of the Morale Conditioning department who escort Dr. Robert Stadler to John Galt. 1117.
671. The second of the two representatives of the Morale Conditioning department. 1117.
672. The valet who assists John Galt in getting dressed for dinner. 1119.
673. The tuxedo wearing escort with a gun who says to Galt, “Don’t make any false moves.” 1119. (Later mischaracterized as his personal secretary, see 1122.)
674. The first of the four armed soldiers who escort John Galt to dinner. 1120.
675. The second of the four armed soldiers who escort John Galt to dinner. 1120.
676. The third of the four armed soldiers who escort John Galt to dinner. 1120.
677. The fourth of the four armed soldiers who escort John Galt to dinner. 1120.
678. The radio announcer at the Wayne-Falkland Hotel. 1120.
679. Army General Whittington S. Thorpe. 1122.
680. Mr. Lucian Phelps, Majority Leader of the National Legislature. 1122.
681. Admiral Homer Dawley. 1122.


Chapter IX: THE GENERATOR

682. A motionless soldier on the ground near Project X. 1128.
683. The soldier, who identifies himself as Joe Blow, and who stopped Dr. Stadler and said, “Where are you going, bud?” 1128.
684. The second soldier who challenges Dr. Stadler and who asked, “Who gave you permission to come here? 1128.
685. The commandant of Project X. 1129.
686. Willie, the chief engineer of Project X. 1129.
687. The unshaved civilian who asks Dr. Stadler, “What do you want?”
688. The Project X worker who yells, “Hey, Cuffy, Take it easy!” 1132.
689. The first of three people who confessed to murder after being subjected to the Ferris Persuader. 1135.
690. The second of three people who confessed to murder after being subjected to the Ferris Persuader. 1135.
691. The third of three people who confessed to murder after being subjected to the Ferris Persuader. 1135.
692. The mechanic in charge of Project F who later declares, “The generator’s on the blink.” 1141. (1143).
693. The chief of the guards. 1146.


Chapter X: IN THE NAME OF THE BEST WITHIN US

694. Rusty, the guard who Dagny executes (See page 1149 for his first name.). 1147.
695. The guard who is executed in the trees. 1148.
696. The first of the three guards bound and gagged in the trees. 1148.
697. The second of the three guards bound and gagged in the trees. 1148.
698. The third of the three guards bound and gagged in the trees. 1148.
699. Pete, the guard at the foot of the stairs to the second floor. 1149.
700. The guard at the landing at the turn of the stairs. 1149.
701. The chief of the guards. 1149.
702. The first of the guards on the second floor. 1149.
703. The second of the guards on the second floor. 1149.
704. The third of the guards on the second floor. 1149.
705. The fourth of the guards on the second floor. 1149.
706. The fifth of the guards on the second floor. 1149.
707. The sixth of the guards on the second floor. 1149.
708. The seventh of the guards on the second floor. 1149.
709. The guard at the bottom of the stone stairs. 1154.
710. The conductor of the last run of the Comet. 1160.
711. The engineer of the last run of the Comet. 1160.
712. The leader of the first of the three warring factions in San Francisco. 1160.
713. The leader of the second of the three warring factions in San Francisco. 1160.
714. The leader of the third of the three warring factions in San Francisco. 1160.
715. The new terminal manager in San Francisco. 1160.
716. The fireman on the last run of the Comet. 1160.
717. The leader of the wagon train who says, “Hey, bud, can I give you a lift?” 1163.
718. The baby that wailed somewhere near the rear of the caravan. 1163.


Alphabetized List of Given Names

  1. Akston, Dr. Hugh.  141.
  2. Allen, Jeff.  656.
  3. Anderson, Mr. unknown first name.  343.
  4. Atwood, Calvin.  723.
  5. Ayers, unknown first name, President of the Ayers Music Publishing company.  24.
  6. Balch, Mr. unknown first name.  343.
  7. Bascom, Mayor unknown first name.  293.
  8. Beal, Luke.  621.
  9. Beecham, Mrs. unknown first name.  34.
  10. Benson, Jock.  71.
  11. Benson, Mr. unknown first name.  941.
  12. Blaine, Liz.  70.
  13. Blodgett, Dr. unknown first name.  823.
  14. Boyle, Orren.   8.
  15. Bradford, Laura.  585.
  16. Brent, Bill.  589.
  17. Brooks, Cherryl.  257 (also see page 262).
  18. Bush, Millie.  663.
  19. Chalmers, Emma.  937.
  20. Chalmers, Kip.  584.
  21. Colby, Tom.  554.
  22. Coleman, Mr. unknown first name.  166.
  23. Conway, Dan.  75.
  24. Cunningham, Roy.  320.
  25. d’Anconia, Francisco.  53.
  26. d’Anconia, Mrs. Sebastian.  91.
  27. d’Anconia, Sebastian.  91.
  28. Danagger, Kenneth.  202.
  29. Daniels, Quentin.  359.
  30. Danneskjold, Ragnar.  151.
  31. Dawley, Admiral Homer.  1122.
  32. Dunphy, Joe.  505.
  33. Eddington, Clarence.  72.
  34. Eubank, Balph. 133.
  35. Ferris, Dr. Floyd.  184.
  36. Fishwife, 482.
  37. Flemming, unknown first name.  206.
  38. Galt, John.  62.
  39. Galt, unknown first name.  John Galt’s father.  786.
  40. Gonzales, Senor Rodrigo.  865.
  41. Gonzales, Senora unknown first name.  865.
  42. Halley, Richard.  13.
  43. Hammond, Lawrence.  202.
  44. Harper, Pop, 11.
  45. Hastings, Mrs. William.  324.
  46. Hastings, William.  324.
  47. Hazleton, Bud.  505.
  48. Hendricks, Dr. Thomas.  711.
  49. Holloway, Tinky.  505.
  50. Hopkins, Mr. unknown first name.  234 (see also 235).
  51. Horton, Dick.  591.
  52. Hunsaker, Lee.  313.
  53. Hunsaker, unknown first name.  Lee’s great-grandfather.  314.
  54. Ives, Gwen.  42.
  55. Jessup, unknown first name.  The night dispatcher at Bradshaw Kansas.  685.
  56. Judson, Lucie.  461.
  57. Judson, unknown first name, Lucie’s son.  461.
  58. Keith-Worthing, Gilbert.  585.
  59. Kellog, Owen.  17.
  60. Kinnan, Fred.  532.
  61. Larkin, Paul.  32.
  62. Lawson, Eugene.  296.
  63. Liddy, Mort.  133.
  64. Locey, Clifton.  568.
  65. Logan, Pat.  233.
  66. Ludlow, Kay.  727.
  67. Marsh, Roger.  380.
  68. Martinez, Senor Mario.  865.
  69. McKim, Ray.  235.
  70. McNamara, Dick.  63 (see also718).
  71. McNeil, unknown first name.  556.
  72. Meigs, Cuffy.  836 (see also842).
  73. Mitchum Dave.  569 (see also 589).
  74. Morrison, Chick.  505.
  75. Mott, Jules. 72.
  76. Mouch, Julius.  537.
  77. Mouch, Wesley.  45.
  78. Mowen, Mr. Horace Bussby 163.  (see also 1122.)
  79. Mulligan, Michael (later Midas).” 315.
  80. Murray, Charles.  950.
  81. Narragansett, Judge unknown first name.  318.
  82. Nealy, Ben.  162.
  83. Nielsen, Ted.  202.
  84. Peters, unknown first name.  990.
  85. Pettibone , Mr. unknown first name.  343.
  86. Phelps, Mr. Lucian.  1122.
  87. Pope, Betty.  70.
  88. Pope, Mrs. Cornelius.  390.
  89. Potter, Dr. unknown first name.  177.
  90. Pritchett, Dr. Simon.  131 (see also 265).
  91. Quinn, unknown first name.  270.
  92. Ramirez, Senior unknown first name.  918.
  93. Rearden, Henry.  19.
  94. Rearden, Lillian.   32.
  95. Rearden, unknown first name, Phillip and Henry Rearden’s Mother.  32.
  96. Rearden. Phillip.  32.
  97. Sanders, Dwight.  217.
  98. Sanders, unknown first name, Dwight’s brother.  217.
  99. Scott, Joseph.  603 (see also 621).
  100. Scudder, Bertram.  134.
  101. Simons, unknown first name.  157.
  102. Slagenhop, Claude.  135.
  103. Stadler, Dr. Robert.  185.
  104. Starnes, Eric.  321.
  105. Starnes, Gerald.  321.
  106. Starnes, Ivy.  323.
  107. Starnes, Jed.  293.
  108. Stockton, Andrew.  202.
  109. Stockton, unknown first name, Andrew’s sister.  351.
  110. Taggart, Dagny, Nat Taggart’s wife.  60 (see also page 102).
  111. Taggart, Dagny.  12.
  112. Taggart, James.  7.
  113. Taggart, Nathaniel.  59.
  114. Thompson, Mr. unknown first name, 820.
  115. Thorpe, General Whittington S. (could this be “Spud?”)  1122 (see also 817).
  116. Tuck, Lester.  585.
  117. Vail, Mr. Gilbert.  69.
  118. Vail, Mrs. Gilbert.  69.
  119. Ward, Mr. unknown first name.  209.
  120. Watts, Buzzy.  503.
  121. Weatherby, Clem.  502.
  122. Weston, Mrs. unknown first name.  157.
    Wet Nurse (see entry number 136).
  123. Whitcomb, Mrs. Unknown first name.  137.
  124. Willers, Eddie.  3.
  125. Wilson, Dr. unknown first name.  192.
  126. Wyatt, Ellis.  9.
  127. Yonts, Mark.  292.
  128. Unknown last name, Clarence. Taggart employee at Winston, Colorado. 589.
  129. Unknown last name, General Spud.”  817 (see also 1122).
  130. Unknown last name, George, the operating vice-president of the Atlantic Southern.  950.
  131. Unknown last name, Gertrude, the Rearden’s new cook.  461.
  132. Unknown last name, Pete.  The guard at the foot of the stairs to the second floor.  1149.
  133. Unknown last name, Pete.  The superintendent of the Rearden Steel Mills.
  134. Unknown last name, Rusty.  The guard who Dagny executes.  1147.  (see also 1149.)
  135. Unknown last name, Sandy. Taggart employee at Winston, Colorado. 589.
  136. Unknown last name, Tony.  The Wet Nurse, Rearden’s Deputy Director of Distribution.  361 (see also 992).
  137. Unknown last name, Willie, the chief engineer of Project X.  1129.


(Note: where a title is given, such as “James Taggart’s secretary,” it is assumed that the individual keeps his job throughout the novel, unless directly indicated otherwise.)

(Note: where a group of an unknown number of people is mentioned (e.g. the trustees of the Utah Institute of Technology), they are not included in these lists.)

(Note: The John Galt line is 300 miles long (page 267), and there were volunteer guards standing at every mile post (see page 242). Also note: the word "milepost" is spelled as two words early in the novel (cf. page 242, "mile post") and as one word later in the novel (cf. page 685 "milepost").)